When It’s Okay To Badmouth Your Employer?

The whole concept behind badmouthing your former employer at a job interview is that you actually end up distorting your own first impression that is crucial for your survival at work. By disparaging your earlier workplace you are actually making your current employers aware of the fact that you can also have similar opinions about them elsewhere.

This can dismantle your chances for selection and raises doubts about your efficacy in workplace as only one side of the picture is present. It is possible that you may be at fault as well and have placed the entire blame on the authority.

The convention of never badmouthing your former employer has to be followed however, at some point you need to take an honest and a bold step in exposing your fears in falling back to the same misery that you took pains to escape. In doing so, you tend to think for yourself and confidently show your employers that you will not settle for anything less and your existence in the company matters a lot.

Lack Of Opportunities:

You are doomed to trap inside a monotonous job that have no room for progress, improvement and opportunities for you to learn in respect to the diverse environment around you. You have great degree, knowledge and skill yet your too narrow job provides no opportunity to you to channelize them in an effective way.

There is no two way communication; you are given a set of rules and regulations and are expected to mold your work pattern in its accordance. This is a serious matter because due to this you left your last job and came to a firm which you perceive may offer you different opportunities. So, it’s better to make things clear in the job interview in the first place.

Fairness In Career Advancement:

There is no point in working in an organization that is based on favors and nepotism. You are truly wasting your skills, education and talents because no one appreciates them and uses them as a key to the workplace prosperity. This came be a major impediment in your journey to success and therefore it is better to communicate such a grave matter at the interview. It will make the interviewer fully aware that you are an honest person and can prick the conscience of your current employers that you are going to work fair and sound.

Work Life Balance:

You need to maintain a substantial balance between your work and other aspects of lives such as health, relationships and your own leisure. You need to come out of your bubble of perfectionism and see that there are other valuable entities that need your attention. You cannot be a slave to the capitalists system all your lives; it is futile that you spend your green healthy years making money and then spend money in restoring your health. Take time for yourself, exercise, meditate laugh with your loved ones; these are your priorities and their importance should be conveyed in the job interview. You surely do not want to be trapped again in the same workaholic culture you ran away from in the previous job.

Environment:

You obviously prefer to work in an environment that is safe, healthy and ensures good working conditions. That point needs to be made clear in the beginning because ill conditions at work was the reason you decided to switch your job.

Be Honest:

Do not be a person who relates series of complaints filled with whines and wails; people seriously do not have time to listen your miseries and this in turn shed a negative light upon your inefficacy to deal with your own problems. Instead by giving an honest depiction of your earlier bad experiences in workplace in terms of lack of opportunities, lack of work balance and unsecured working conditions, you are setting standards for yourselves and expectations for your employers.

So, being truthful in the first place may provide some snags and hitches in getting you a job as you are confident and blatant approach may not please your employers initially. But it’s better to call spade a spade and set things right for yourself; who wants to plunge in the rubble again?


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When It’s Okay To Badmouth Your Employer?

The whole concept behind badmouthing your former employer at a job interview is that you actually end up distorting your own first impression that is crucial for your survival at work. By disparaging your earlier workplace you are actually making your current employers aware of the fact that you can also have similar opinions about them elsewhere.

This can dismantle your chances for selection and raises doubts about your efficacy in workplace as only one side of the picture is present. It is possible that you may be at fault as well and have placed the entire blame on the authority.

The convention of never badmouthing your former employer has to be followed however, at some point you need to take an honest and a bold step in exposing your fears in falling back to the same misery that you took pains to escape. In doing so, you tend to think for yourself and confidently show your employers that you will not settle for anything less and your existence in the company matters a lot.

Lack Of Opportunities:

You are doomed to trap inside a monotonous job that have no room for progress, improvement and opportunities for you to learn in respect to the diverse environment around you. You have great degree, knowledge and skill yet your too narrow job provides no opportunity to you to channelize them in an effective way.

There is no two way communication; you are given a set of rules and regulations and are expected to mold your work pattern in its accordance. This is a serious matter because due to this you left your last job and came to a firm which you perceive may offer you different opportunities. So, it’s better to make things clear in the job interview in the first place.

Fairness In Career Advancement:

There is no point in working in an organization that is based on favors and nepotism. You are truly wasting your skills, education and talents because no one appreciates them and uses them as a key to the workplace prosperity. This came be a major impediment in your journey to success and therefore it is better to communicate such a grave matter at the interview. It will make the interviewer fully aware that you are an honest person and can prick the conscience of your current employers that you are going to work fair and sound.

Work Life Balance:

You need to maintain a substantial balance between your work and other aspects of lives such as health, relationships and your own leisure. You need to come out of your bubble of perfectionism and see that there are other valuable entities that need your attention. You cannot be a slave to the capitalists system all your lives; it is futile that you spend your green healthy years making money and then spend money in restoring your health. Take time for yourself, exercise, meditate laugh with your loved ones; these are your priorities and their importance should be conveyed in the job interview. You surely do not want to be trapped again in the same workaholic culture you ran away from in the previous job.

Environment:

You obviously prefer to work in an environment that is safe, healthy and ensures good working conditions. That point needs to be made clear in the beginning because ill conditions at work was the reason you decided to switch your job.

Be Honest:

Do not be a person who relates series of complaints filled with whines and wails; people seriously do not have time to listen your miseries and this in turn shed a negative light upon your inefficacy to deal with your own problems. Instead by giving an honest depiction of your earlier bad experiences in workplace in terms of lack of opportunities, lack of work balance and unsecured working conditions, you are setting standards for yourselves and expectations for your employers.

So, being truthful in the first place may provide some snags and hitches in getting you a job as you are confident and blatant approach may not please your employers initially. But it’s better to call spade a spade and set things right for yourself; who wants to plunge in the rubble again?


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